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“Victorian Boyhoods” Speakers

Karen Bourrier

Oliver S. Buckton

Kelly Hager

Jenny Holt

Jongwoo Jeremy Kim

U.C. Knoepflmacher

Claudia Nelson

Pamela Thurschwell

 

Karen Bourrier

“Tom Tulliver’s Schooldays”

Personal Page
Karen Bourrier received her PhD from Cornell University in 2009 and is currently lecturer at Boston University. Her work has appeared in Dickens Studies Annual, The Victorian Review and Victorian Literature and Culture. She is at work on a book project entitled Narrative Fatigue: Masculine Weakness and the Culture of Industry in Nineteenth-Century Fiction, which argues that the mid-century novel saw a proliferation of disabled and crippled male narrator figures in response to the rise of the taciturn, muscular hero.

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Oliver S. Buckton

“The White Boy’s Burden: Kipling’s Kim and the Recruitment of the Imperial Spy”

Faculty Page

Oliver S. Buckton is Professor of English at Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, where he teaches Victorian literature and culture, critical theory, and film. He is the author of Secret Selves: Confession and Same-Sex Desire in Victorian Autobiography (1998) and Cruising with Robert Louis Stevenson: Travel, Narrative and the Colonial Body (2007), a study of the interconnections between gender, the body, and colonialism in Robert Louis Stevenson’s travel writing. His current research project focuses on the relationships between imperialism, adventure, masculinity, and espionage in the British spy novel.

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Kelly Hager

“Consider Yourself My Dad: Victorian Boys and the Construction of Family”

Faculty Page

Kelly Hager is Associate Professor of English and Women’s & Gender Studies at Simmons College, where she teaches Victorian literature and children’s literature. She is the author of Dickens and the Rise of Divorce: The Failed-Marriage Plot and the Novel Tradition (Ashgate 2010) and of articles on The Five Little Peppers, children’s literature and canon formation, and the Brontës and adolescence. She is a contributor to The Oxford Handbook of Children’s Literature, Keywords for Children’s Literature, and The Oxford Encyclopedia of Children’s Literature and is currently working on “Novel Constructions,” a project that considers how the novel constructs ideas of physical, intellectual, and psychosexual health, and, with Talia Schaffer, “Extended Families,” an exploration of nineteenth-century family formations and ideologies in Britain that seeks to resist the privileging of the nuclear family and the teleology of the heteronormative courtship plot.

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Jenny Holt

“Stolen Boyhoods: Reappraising Charles Kingsley’s Role in the Chimney Sweeper Campaign”

Faculty Page
Jenny Holt studied at the universities of Leeds and Oxford and is Associate Professor in English Literature at Meiji University in Tokyo. She is the author of Public School Literature, Civic Education and the Politics of Male Adolescence, and has published work on children’s and young adult literature and on Victorian representations of Japan. She is also currently writing and illustrating a book for children.

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Jongwoo Jeremy Kim

“Boys and Pictorial Longing: Henry Scott Tuke”

Faculty Page

Jongwoo Jeremy Kim (Ph.D., Institute of Fine Arts, NYU, 2007) is an assistant professor of modern art at the University of Louisville. Reassessing portrayals of male bodies in their narrative context, Kim’s book, Painted Men in Britain, 1868-1925: Royal Academicians and Masculinities (forthcoming, Ashgate, 2012) analyzes transgressions of gender and sexuality as represented in paintings by Frederic Leighton, John Singer Sargent, Henry Scott Tuke, and their contemporary Royal Academicians. The publication of this book is supported by a grant from the Historians of British Art.

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U.C. Knoepflmacher

“From Boyhood to Adolescence: Robert Browning and Mark Twain as Rudyard Kipling’s Literary Models”

Faculty page

U. C. Knoepflmacher is the Paton Foundation Foundation Professor Emeritus of Ancient and Modern Literature at Princeton University. A specialist in nineteenth-century British literature and in British and American children’s classics, he has authored six books and edited or co-edited a dozen volumes, the most recent of which is Victorian Hybridities (Johns Hopkins UP, 2010). He has also published over a hundred essays, the latest being, “Boy-Orphans, Mesmeric Villains, and Film-Starts: Inscribing Oliver Twist into Treasure Island” (Victorian Literature & Culture, March 2011). Knoepflmacher has been the recipient of two Guggenheim fellowships, two fellowships from the NEH, and a Rockefeller senior fellowship. He holds lifetime awards from the Children’s Literature Association and Princeton University.

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Claudia Nelson

Faculty Page

Claudia Nelson is professor of English and Cornerstone Faculty Fellow at Texas A&M University. She is the series editor for Ashgate Studies in Childhood, 1700-Present. In addition to having coedited three volumes of essays, she is the author of Boys Will Be Girls: The Feminine Ethic and British Children’s Fiction, 1857-1917, Invisible Men: Fatherhood in Victorian Periodicals, 1850-1910, Little Strangers: Portrayals of Adoption in America, 1850-1929 and Family Ties in Victorian England. With Susan Egenolf and Julie-Marie Strange, she is editing a five-volume series of source documents on the British family in the long nineteenth century, scheduled for publication by Pickering & Chatto in 2013. Her talk at this conference is based on her most recent book project, Age Inversion and the Victorians: Representing Child-Men, Child-Women, and the “Old-Fashioned” Child.

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Pamela Thurschwell

“Fighting Father Time: Jude the Obscure and Modern Adolescence”

Faculty Page

Pam Thurschwell is a senior lecturer in English at the University of Sussex and the author of Literature, Technology and Magical Thinking, 1880-1920 (Cambridge 2001) and Sigmund Freud (Routledge 2000). She has co-edited with Nicola Bown and Carolyn Burdett, The Victorian Supernatural (Cambridge 2004) and with Leah Price, Literary Secretaries/Secretarial Culture (Ashgate 2005). She is currently working on a monograph tentatively titled Out of Time on the temporality of late 19th and early 20th century adolescence in literature, culture and psychoanalysis.

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