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2014: “Bad Victorians” Speakers

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Rachel Ablow

Catherine Gallagher

Deborah Lutz

Andrew Mangham

Helena Michie

Alex Murray

James Najarian

Sharon Aronofsky Weltman

 


Rachel Ablow

Rachel Ablow is associate professor of English at University at Buffalo, SUNY. She is the author of The Marriage of Minds: Reading Sympathy in the Victorian Marriage Plot, and the editor of The Feeling of Reading: Affective Experience and Victorian Literature, and of a special issue of Victorian Studies on Victorian emotions. She is currently working on a project on Victorian pain.

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Catherine Gallagher

Catherine Gallagher is the emeritus Eggers Professor of English Literature at the University of California at Berkeley. Her books include The Industrial Reformation of English Fiction: Social Discourse and Narrative Form, 1832-67 (1985), Nobody’s Story: The Vanishing Acts of Women Writers in the Literary Marketplace (1994), Practicing New Historicism (2000, with Stephen Greenblatt), and The Body Economic: Life, Death, and Sensation in Political Economy and the Victorian Novel (2006). She is currently writing a history of modern counterfactual historical narratives.

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Deborah Lutz

Deborah Lutz’s books include the forthcoming Relics of Death in Victorian Literature and Culture (Cambridge University Press, 2015); The Brontë Cabinet: Three Lives in Nine Objects (also forthcoming, Norton, 2015); The Dangerous Lover: Gothic Villains, Byronism, and the Nineteenth-Century Seduction Narrative (Ohio State UP, 2006); and Pleasure Bound: Victorian Sex Rebels and the New Eroticism (Norton, 2011). She is an Associate Professor at Long Island University, C.W. Post, and her current project explores albums and books filled with plants and material objects.

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Andrew Mangham

Andrew Mangham is Associate Professor of Victorian Literature and Culture at the University of Reading (UK). He is the author of Violent Women and Sensation Fiction (2007) and editor of a number of books including The Cambridge Companion to Sensation Fiction (2013). He is currently writing a book about Dickens and Forensic Medicine.

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Helena Michie

Helena Michie is Professor of English at Rice University. She is the author of Victorian Honeymoons: Journeys to the Conjugal (Cambridge UP 2006); The Flesh Made Word: Female Figures and Women’s Bodies (Oxford UP 1987); Sororophobia: Differences among Women in Literature and Culture (Oxford UP 1991); and co-author, with Naomi R. Cahn of Confinements: Fertility and Infertility in Contemporary United States Culture (Rutgers UP 1997). She has published articles on feminist theory and on Victorian literature and has been an NEH and a Guggenheim fellow. She is the co-editor, with Ronald Thomas, of the essay collection Nineteenth-Century Geographies: The Transformation of Space from the Victorian Age to the American Century (Rutgers UP 2002). Professor Michie teaches courses in feminist theory, literary theory, and Victorian literature and culture, as well as workshops on professional writing. Her current project, with Robyn Warhol, is a meta-archival account of writing the life of Sir George Scharf, entitled Love Among the Archives.

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Alex Murray

Alex Murray is Senior Lecturer in English at the University of Exeter. He publishes on Victorian literature, Modernism, contemporary literature and critical theory. He recently edited, with Jason David Hall, Decadent Poetics: Literature and Form at the British Fin de Siècle (Palgrave, 2013) and has essays recently published, or forthcoming, in English Literature in Transition, 1880-1920, Modernism/modernity and The Oxford Handbook of Victorian Literary Culture. He is currently completing a manuscript entitled Landscapes of Decadence: Literature and Place, 1880-1920.

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James Najarian

James Najarian received his BA, MA, and PhD degrees from Yale University. He teaches at Boston College, where he edits the scholarly journal Religion and the Arts and directs the PhD program in English. He published Victorian Keats: Manliness, Sexuality and Desire (Palgrave Macmillan, 2003). His most recent article is “Verse Versus the Novel” in The Oxford Handbook of the Victorian Novel ed. Lisa Rodensky (Oxford, 2013). He is working on a study of the development of the category of the “Minor Poet” in the late Romantic- early Victorian era.

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Sharon Aronofsky Weltman

Sharon Aronofsky Weltman is Professor of English at Louisiana State University. She is the author of two books, Performing the Victorian (2007) and Ruskin’s Mythic Queen (1999), plus a scholarly edition of the original 1847 Sweeney Todd melodrama as a special issue of Nineteenth-Century Theatre and Film (2012). Her work on that play and its roundabout adaptation into Sondheim’s Sweeney Todd has appeared in Dickens Studies Annual, Victorian Literature and Culture, Journal of Victorian Culture, and BRANCH. She has also published on John Ruskin, Thomas Carlyle, George Eliot, Charles Dickens, Charlotte Brontë, Oscar Wilde, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, John Keats, Jane Ellen Harrison, and Christina Rossetti. This summer, she will be directing an NEH Summer Seminar for College and University Professors at UC-Santa Cruz entitled “Performing Dickens: Oliver Twist and Great Expectations on Page, Stage, and Screen.” Her interests range widely from Victorian art, theater, periodicals, and material culture through most literary genres to Broadway musicals and dance history. Her current book project, Victorians on Broadway, examines Victorian literature adapted to the twentieth-century American musical stage.

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