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2013: “Inventing Victorian Race” Speakers

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Patrick Brantlinger

Aviva Briefel

Bryan Cheyette

Daniel Hack

Neville Hoad

Faith Smith

Irene Tucker

Tim Watson 

 


Patrick Brantlinger

Patrick Brantlinger is the Rudy Professor of English and Victorian Studies (Emeritus) from Indiana University. He has published ten books, several of them on race and the British Empire in the 1800s. Brantlinger edited Victorian Studies (1980-90) and chaired the Department of English at Indiana University (1990-1994). In 2001, he was named College Alumni Distinguished Professor. He has a new book forthcoming this fall on current affairs, States of Emergency, from Indiana University Press.

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Aviva Briefel

Aviva Briefel is Associate Professor of English and Film Studies at Bowdoin College. She is the author of The Deceivers: Art Forgery and Identity in the Nineteenth Century (Cornell UP, 2006) and co-editor of Horror after 9/11: World of Fear, Cinema of Terror (Texas UP, 2011). She is currently completing a book titled Amputations: Racial Representation and the Hand in Late-Victorian Narrative.

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Bryan Cheyette

Bryan Cheyette is Chair in Modern Literature at the University of Reading. He is the editor of seven books and author of Constructions of ‘the Jew’ in English Literature and Society (Cambridge University Press, 1993 & 1995) and Muriel Spark (Northcote House, 2000) and is completing Diasporas of the Mind: Literature and ‘Race’ after the Holocaust (Yale University Press, 2013). He has recently guest edited the journal Wasifiri and is co-editor of volume VII of the Oxford History of the Novel in English on the British and Irish novel, 1940-2000.

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Daniel Hack

Daniel Hack is associate professor and graduate chair of English at the University of Michigan. Author of The Material Interests of the Victorian Novel (2005), his current book-project explores the presence of Victorian literature in nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century African American literature and print culture. Work related to this project has appeared in Critical Inquiry, Novel: A Forum on Fiction, the edited collection Early African American Print Culture, and elsewhere, including, most recently, Victorian Studies, where his article “Wild Charges: The Afro-Haitian ‘Charge of the Light Brigade’” appeared in Winter 2012.

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Neville Hoad

Neville Hoad is Associate Professor of English and Women’s and Gender Studies at The University of Texas at Austin. He is the author of African Intimacies: Race, Homosexuality and Globalization (Minnesota UP, 2007) and co-editor (with Karen Martin and Graeme Reid) of Sex & Politics in South Africa: Equality/Gay & Lesbian Movement/the anti-Apartheid Struggle (Double Storey, 2005). He is currently working on a book project about the literary and cultural representations of the HIV/AIDS pandemic in sub-Saharan Africa.

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Faith Smith

Faith Smith is writing a book about Caribbean people’s conceptions of the future across multiple imperial registers in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, entitled Whose Modern? Caribbean Cultural and Intellectual Formation, 1885-1915. She edited the collection Sex and the Citizen: Interrogating the Caribbean (UP of Virginia, 2011), and published Creole Recitations: John Jacob Thomas and Colonial Formation in the Late Nineteenth-Century Caribbean (UP of Virginia, 2002). She teaches at Brandeis University.

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Irene Tucker

Irene Tucker is associate professor of English at University of California, Irvine.  She is the author of A Probable State: The Novel, the Contract, and the Jews, and, more recently, The Moment of Racial Sight: A History, both from University of Chicago Press.

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Tim Watson

Tim Watson is Associate Professor of English and Director of American Studies at the University of Miami. He is the author of Caribbean Culture and British Fiction in the Atlantic World, 1780-1870 (Cambridge University Press, 2008) and editor, with Candace Ward of Florida State University, of a new edition of the 1827 novel Hamel, the Obeah Man by Cynric R. Williams (Broadview Press, 2010).

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